The Hoosac Valley; its legends and its history

Books
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 Excerpt: ...over the lake to surprise the garrison of Fort Ticonderoga. Captain Douglass of the Hancock company was appointed to visit his brother-in-law, Smith, residing at Brideport, twelve miles down Lake Champlain, and endeavor by some stratagem to get possession of the King's boats at Crown Point and row them up to Shoreham before light on May 10th. Capt. Noah Phelps, in the habit of a Yankee farmer, visited Fort Ticonderoga meanwhile and observed the garrison's strength. He engaged the lad, Nathan Beeman, to meet Col. Ethan Allen and his militia before sunrise on May 10th and conduct them through the wicket gate to the British stronghold. Phelps affected a most awkward appearance and inquired for a barber, under the pretence of desiring to be shaved. He amused the gallants of Old England with his simple questions and meanwhile observed the position of the artillery. He certainly returned to Colonel Allen's camp a type of those Yankee varlets of Connecticut described by Washington Irving as belonging to the Dutch period of "Fort Good Hope." After the close of the Castleton Council, May 8th, a gust of confusion arose with the arrival of Benedict Arnold. He was clad in a colonel's epauletted uniform, accompanied by a colored servant. Each was mounted upon a very much winded steed. Arnold presented Chairman Mott his Massachusetts Commission1 as colonel of an expedition to be sent against Fort Ticonderoga. He claimed that it gave him the right to command Colonel Allen's Green Mountain Boys' militia, financially equipped by the Connecticut Committee of War. Colonial rivalry, personal honor, and national glory were all at stake. The consternation of Chairman Mott and Colonel Allen's Green Mountain Boys was intense. The latter swore in chorus that rather than b...